Drinking alcohol has become such a social norm that, chances are, most people reading this article participate in the consumption of alcohol. In fact, “In 2012, 87.6 percent of people ages 18 or older reported that they drank alcohol at some point in their lifetime; 71 percent reported that they drank in the past year; 56.3 percent reported that they drank in the past month.” While that report reflects moderate drinking statistics, the statistics of people who binge drink are quite jarring. “In 2012, 24.6 percent of people ages 18 or older reported that they engaged in binge drinking in the past month; 7.1 percent reported that they engaged in heavy drinking in the past month.” While drinking is not necessarily a detriment to every person, it can, and does, negatively affect people’s lives. With a culture so immersed in drinking, many people don’t even notice that they have a problem. Alcohol marketing efforts have increased due to social media and interactive marketing ploys. Their main target? Women.

With the evolution of social media, businesses now have pages on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and interact with their followers daily. Budweiser’s margarita flavored drinks are popping up in sponsored posts on Instagram and Facebook ads are targeting consumers, mainly women, all in the name of buying more drinks. Creating a persona for these companies, social media connects users with their favorite products better than ever. While this might sound great for a marketing company, it can become a detriment to society by creating an acceptable, often sought after, lifestyle that is heavily influenced by drinking. Alcohol isn’t only being marketed on social media, either. When perusing the aisles of any liquor store you will find bottles targeted to women with names like “Mommy Juice” “Girlie Girl” and “Mad Housewife.” Why do marketing companies do this? Because it works.

“Sixty percent of U.S. women have at least one drink a year. Among women who drink, 13 percent have more than seven drinks per week,” reports the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Moderate drinking is defined as “no more than one drink a day for women.” Drinking more than the recommended limit can pose health risks including high blood pressure, depression, liver disease, heart disease and injuries due to drinking and driving accidents. Factors such as stress, age, peer pressure, and family history all play a part in someone’s chance of having a problem with alcohol.

If you find that you drink well above the recommended limit and often miss work or school due to issues associated with drinking, it is time to get help. Women for Sobriety is a great online tool for those who are in any stage of recovery. The first step in seeking help is admitting that you have a problem. For information on detox programs, group therapy, and other resources to help you kick your drinking habit, visit The Bergand Group today.

About The Bergand Group:

At The Bergand Group in Baltimore, MD our therapists have more than twenty years of experience in the mental health and addiction fields. Our focus is on providing comprehensive mental health care and appropriate care for addictive disorders. We offer both alcohol rehabilitation and drug rehabilitation. If you or someone you know is struggling with alcohol or substance addiction, there is help available. We also offer several other services, including family therapy and counseling. We can help. Contact us today.